Fairly accurate Axle weights

jimberlake

Well-Known Member
Got a garage round the corner that’s just had his MOT rollers installed so he let me have a go on them to test the brake efficiency after I rebuilt them all (as I don’t MOT it anymore). It’s a one only remaining Norwich Conversions and has an alloy head engine and alloys so maybe slightly different but the scores were:
1055kg front axle (with me in it)
756kg rear axle

so not quite Porsche distribution

didn’t have full camping gear in just the interior
 
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StuntmanAd

New Member
Is that figure not braking effort rather than axle weights?

I borrowed a 5000kg capable weighing scales from work the other week and weighed my Saab swapped Commer Wanderer. Its devoid of any interior, has a P5b rear axle which I know is heavier than stock and a Saab 2.3 engine and Omega auto box which are both quite chunky.

It came in at 1315Kg.

Maybe far too many variables to be of any use to a more standard Commer owner ‍♂️
 

jimberlake

Well-Known Member
interesting that, I ‘think’ it was before we tested the brakes but that’s a big difference though. Mine was fully kitted out but not full of gear - can’t imagine it would be close to making that much difference. I’d be inclined to trust your scales more than my measure
 

StuntmanAd

New Member
Yer because 1800kg (your weights combined) is quite alot of weight for a stumpy little Commer.

I remember seeing a weigh sheet for a long wheelbase LDV mini bus that was going through some sort of certification to become a passenger vehicle and it weighed 1750kg.

To get 'proper' axle weights I think you need to take in to account centre of gravity, lever moments etc Complicated stuff
 

PaulJL

Well-Known Member
You are only measuring the axle weights though, not the whole van. The rollers at work measure the axle weights but when added together are actually greater than the kerb weight as the front axle weight is pretty much everything from the rear axle forward and vice versa.
 
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